Archive for July, 2015

July 26th, 2015 ~ by admin

Sun CoolThreads UltraSPARC T1 Sample

Sun UltraSPARC TI Marketing Sample

Sun UltraSPARC TI Marketing Sample

The Sun UltraSPARC IV consumed 105 Watts at 1350 MHz.  This for a dual core processor that could process 2 threads.  Sun decided that the T1 (aka the Niagra) was going to change that.  It was the first ground up redesign of the SPARC core since the UltraSPARC III.  Interestingly Sun originally first attempted to develop a multithreaded process by using a pair of UltraSPARC II cores on a single die.  That project was canceled in 2004, as the T1 was in development.

The T1 was designed to focus on maximum processor utilization.  It contained up to 8 cores, each of which could process 4 threads.  This allows the processor to be used more efficiently, as a single thread can not slow down the entire processor.  All 8 cores share a single Floating Point unit.  This worked well for most database type processing, as FP instructions are not very common in that type of computing.  The T2 (made on a smaller process) allowed for a FP unit for each core which allowed better performance in HPC applications.

Made by TI on a 90nm process, the T1’s 279 million transistors consume only 72 Watts, a 30% reduction from the UltraSPARC IV at a similar clock speed.  This is what Sun called CoolThreads Technology.  Released in November of 2005 Sun was a bit ahead of their time, lower power, more efficient processors were only just beginning to become an important selling point.  Interestingly, its sister project, the UltraSPARC Rk, turned out to be not so cool.  Today, 10 years later, energy efficiency is one of the key metrics when measuring processor performance.  With data centers having on average 50,000 computers, 30 Watts per chip adds up, quick.

July 16th, 2015 ~ by admin

TI SN74LS481: A Better Bit-Slicer

TI SN74LS481J -1980 - 8 MHZ 4-bit Slice

TI SN74LS481J -1980 – 8 MHZ 4-bit Slice

The 1970’s was a rush to design new and innovative processors, faster, more features, and more bits.  Most of the processors were new designs, a few were single chip implementations of older mainframes (such as the TMS9900 and the Intersil 6100.  At the same time there was a competition of 4-bit processors.  Somewhat remarkable in 1976 considering 16-bit designs were now being released.  The most famous was of course the AMD AM2901, which undoubtable won the battle.  There were others, the MMI 6701 (a company which AMD would go on to merge with).  Motorola had the MC10800, made in ECL and Intel made the ill-fated (probably since it was only 2-bits) Intel 3002 Processor.  TI made the SBP0400 in I2L that enjoyed some success, but that apparently wasn’t enough.  In 1976, the same year as the SBP0400, the 6701 and the AMD AM2901, TI released the SN74S481.  This was a Schottky TTL 4-bit slice processor (and the SN74S482 sequencer for it).  It was a bit different than its competition.

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July 11th, 2015 ~ by admin

MCS-8 Test Boards Now For Sale

MCS-8 Test BoardThe CPU Shack Museum is pleased to announce the availability of Test Board Systems for the Intel 8008 Processor.  This system will allow you to test, as well as design program for, the Intel 8008 8-bit processor as well as its several 2nd sources, including the Siemens SAB8008, the Microsystem International MF8008 and the unlicensed East German MME U808D.

The Test System is loosely based on the 1973 MARK 8 computer, one of the very first computers to use the 8008, which was arguably the worlds first 8-bit processor.

The Boards are available here for $149 with FREE Shipping Worldwide.